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20121201
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English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from random house to all of its employees. pretty nice. >> yes, call it 50 shades of green, if you will. random house, which is the publisher of "50 shades of grey," the lascivious adult novel that's been all the rage this year, the company has seen major uptick in large part because of the book and soars. the ceo announced this week at the holiday party that every one of the employees will get a $5,000 bonus this year. that's really great news especially in the world of publishing, which has been sort of on a downward death spiral. >> that's really nice for them. well, great. thank you very much. morgan brennan. >> in today's one-minute play back. governor chris christie on "the daily show" the universal telethon for hurricane sandy victims and about meeting the boss bruce springsteen back stage. >> he came up, put his hands down. shook his hand. i tried to be cool. i wasn't. then he said, come on, give me a hug. i said, all right. i hugged him. >> did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to ju
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
, new york -- at least where you have a large big city and minorities, they like to cut them off. >> the thing is, there are no rules in the constitution about picking electors to the electoral college. every state gets to -- >> why do they -- >> it became the consensus position over time. that winner takes all. if you wanted to do the system, could you make the argument that you should drop off electoral votes by population in every state. that would be fair if you did that in every state, in which case it would reflect the popular vote. but that's not what they are doing here and they tried to do this before this election and even a more weighted way. if you win the congressional district, you get the electoral from that district and under that situation, obama winning pennsylvania would have gotten seven out of the 20 electoral votes. >> ron, fb you're in a minority community, it seems that you want it the way it is now because leverage in from michigan to detroit, for example. or chicago. if it was just every person and you didn't give that bloc vote power to people, be they
of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment. separate of votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced come electors will sig
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
guns in their homes. and you can figure out when may not. it is a local new york city wit large circulation, they are saying that the gun control and the happening of newtown, connecticut are in the minds of this readers. so they published a map of where all handgun owners live. on the journal news website, all you have to do is zoom into a neighborhood and the locations of any gun permit holders will show up with red dots tap a dot, and the name and address of the permit holder pop up. the newspaper got the data by filing freedom of information requests with the clerks of the county. they do not indicate whether the residents own the guns just that they are legally able to. and homes are shot guns and rifles are not included because in those counties those can be bought but permits. but the news has brought backlash. the same complaint was made by some readers. i think aforesait was an irresp thing for them the to do. it's saying to robbers go to the home next door, they do not have a gun. or thieves that want to steal the guns will know where to get them. at this store, i spok
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
that came to be this political machine. but by and large it was run by these two guys. an irish man and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless ethnics and political wizards, scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six pounds all together. it is troy, schenectady, its saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live. and to see. there's a lot to see. account is coming back. it's also a great, beautiful town. a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore people thought it had. >> on a recent visit to albany, new york, with the help of our partner time warner cable, booktv explored the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher living -- learning including the university of albany, stage and president of new york, a albany law school which is the fourth oldest law sch
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
but again sandy hook elementary school, 60 miles from new york city. small community. rather large elementary school of nearly 700 students, kin guard 10 to 4th grade. a shooting at this elementary school. breaking details as we come into the newsroom. jon? jon: now that u.n. ambassador susan rice officially has taken herself out of the running to become secretary of state there is new speculation who president obama's nomination will go to. right now massachusetts senator john kerry considered to be at the top of the list. let's talk about it with paul gigot, editorial page editor of "the wall street journal." ironic, because if it had been susan rice, john kerry's committee would have to confirm her in the senate. >> that's right. jon: now that problem is done away with. >> well, that's right. and it would have been a big fight. jon: not a problem i should say. the circumstance. >> it would have been a big political fight. in that sense susan rice did the president a favor by removing herself from the, from the discussions so that they won't have to have this fight and the presid
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
area where you will find a lot of gun violence and if you look at some cities, some urban areas where there are large numbers of gun deaths, it's not because of mental illness. it's because of the drug trade, the drug business, of course, and crime. >> isn't there a part of it that people who are witnessing and dealing with those environments and who are living through these shootings, then there is an issue with mental illness. a kid growing up in that environment -- >> it's traumatic. it's traumatic. it's a tough thing for any kid. there was a time at our church where on new year's eve, when we had our new year's eve celebration, as soon as the clock turned 12:00, we knew it was 12:00 because we could hear the gunfire outside our church. that hasn't happened in recent years. but that's a frightening thing to know that on new year's eve, you might get hit by a stray bullet. >> and it happens. it happens. but i also think, you know, in thinking about our administrative assistant we had whose son was shot and killed on easter sunday. he came out on the porch to talk to another kid, sho
of this mosaic that came to be this political machine. but by and large it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city that's in the subtitle, fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >> albany, new york, is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original 13 colonies and the longest continuously-chartered city in the united states. next, we hear from jack casey. his book tells the story of a mohawk woman born in 1656 who was recently named the first native american to enter saint hood. >>
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
of this mosaic that came to be this political machine but by and large it was run by the 2 guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless that makes, political wizards, underrated scoundrels, and we still have a lot of those, but it is a different town now, it is no longer just albany. it is about five or six tones all put together. saratoga is homely half an hour away. these are great places to live. pat and to see. there is a lot to see in this town. the town is coming back. it is a beautiful town. it is a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford might. >> on a recent visit to albany, n.y. with the help of time warner cable booktv explore the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state univ. of new york, the albany law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> we are getting pictures in here from michigan and show you and tell you what's happening there. there are large protests, basically closing down the state capitol building here. this is lansingmy, michigan. eight people arrested. there are a couple thousand people protesting inside the building. a number of them outside the capitol building. police, they say they're not letting anyone else inside. 50 state troopers are there on the ground. protests are over a push by the governor of michigan, rick snyder to make michigan a right to work state. letting workers in michigan decide whether or not they want to join unions. so the capitol is scheduled to close in just about two and a half hours from now. so police say anyone who refuses to leave will be arrested and will be charged with trespa trespassing. >>> i want to talk about this, though. one of the biggest companies, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >>
at the school bus for her beloved owner, norah. and their proud momma gets the lotto of love living large in connecticut. >> in all, we found homes for more than 50 dogs and cats in 2012. a few of the families with us now along with richard from animal control in new york city. good morning, everyone. richard, this has to make you feel great, seeing this lineup, a perfect year. >> i love this segment and everything we do and all these wonderful people that adopted from us, it is very very touching. >> absolutely. let's meet some of the dogs. tell me about buddy. you got him two days before super storm sandy? >> yes. we took him home and he was on the street. he couldn't go on the street sunday. the first time he went on the street was in the sand, almost two feet of sand that came on our street. >> what has he meant to you as you look to recover? i know your home was washed out. >> we went to brooklyn and is fabulous. he is extremely loving and gets along very well with my other dog. they trail along together all over the place. >> he's beautiful. i want to meet petey over here, the three
was in the service. i'm also the parent of a son murdered on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of a church. i'm here to support h.r. 308, the large capacity ammunition feeding device act, which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. there are 264,194 a.r.-15 rifles, manufactured each year in the u.s., and of those, 5,443 are exported overseas, and 248,751 are used right here in the u.s. and the very irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's trade association, their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school, and while it is important, i also have a bill that i want to acknowledge, h.r. 6680, the firearm licensing and record of sale act of 2012, a legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority over the program. as sad and inexplicable as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroi
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
are responding to a natural disaster. host: an image of something purchase by a department in kansas city. bomb detection robot despite already having two. local officials on that one of the broken robot set largely unused four years brought brought it back on line after two high schoolers were asked to repaired which they did for only $5. hines from louisiana. good morning. caller: i have a question, as far as these grants for security threats do you do they apply to united states trust territories like micronesia -- micronesia, close to china, or is it just for the 50 states. guest: a really good question they apply to of the federated territories as well and for some of the grant programs there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided for the different territories. join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)